<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=183154879077085&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

Blog

Scura, Wigfield, Heyer, Stevens & Cammarota Blog

Anthony Gramuglia


Recent Posts

When Can You File Emergency Bankruptcy in New Jersey?

There is a pile of envelops, unopened, piling like a mountain outside your door – so dense and heavy you cannot escape your home. The statements from the bank reveal your accounts are empty. You have no lines of open credit left. The accumulating unpaid dues are too much. Your credit score is in the gutter. Bankruptcy is your best option right now, and you need it now.

Bankruptcy always feels like an emergency. Financial difficulties are urgent matters that drag us into the muck. Debts and unpaid bills tether us to weights that plunge us into a financial oblivion from which there seems to be no escape. Or, at least, that is how it appears. No situation is ever as hopeless as it appears when you are experiencing it. Your problems have solutions.

Emergency bankruptcy is one such solution. However, what differentiates an "emergency bankruptcy" from an ordinary bankruptcy? As it turns out, very little.

What Does Wrongful Death Mean?

People know what murder is. They know what it means when a person dies in a vehicle crash or as the result of medical malpractice. These are terms that are familiar enough to a regular person that when you say “Bob died from cancer” or “Bob died when a semi-truck rolled over his skull,” that you immediately understand what happened and why it happened.

Less understood, however, is the concept of wrongful death. All death, in the eyes of the bereaved, is wrongful and hurtful and should not have happened. Every family wishes they could stave off the death of a loved one and feel wronged by nature when death comes knocking. However, in the eyes of the Civil Courts, what counts as wrongful death? How is wrongful death different from a criminal act of murder? And how can you recover from this?

Jaywalker v Reckless Driver – Who was Responsible for the Injury?

Reckless driving and reckless walking can lead to some unsafe situations. When someone drives around without looking at the road or walks on the road without looking, things, unsurprisingly, will go wrong very fast. It seems inevitable that their mutual negligence will result in someone colliding into the other and that the motorized vehicle, being faster and larger, will cause more severe damage to the smaller, frailer human.

But when the case is brought to civil court, who is at fault? Who would be more at fault for the situation? New Jersey is a partial comparative negligence state. This means that the jury will place a percentage of responsibility on the parties involved. If the jury determines that the jaywalker is 50% responsible for the accident, they will pay 50% of the personal injury damages, while the other 50% will be paid by the driver. However, in these cases, what factors would a jury and judge need to consider in order to determine who pays what?

Scura Represents The First Subchapter V Bankruptcy Plan for an Individual

We are proud to present the first consensual Chapter 11 Subchapter V Bankruptcy Plan of Reorganization for an individual debtor. Here, the Debtor’s proposed plan of reorganization was approved by the US Bankruptcy Court for the District of New Jersey on September 8, 2020, and was primarily handled by one of Scura’s attorneys, Carlos D. Martinez, Esq. This is a groundbreaking case for bankruptcy law and for the implementation of the new Small Business Reorganization Act

6 Common Car Mechanical Failures That Can Get You Into an Accident

Personal Injury cases often deal with car accidents. People can be seriously hurt or injured by a vehicle when driving. You might find yourself rammed from the side, rear-ended, or cut off in abrupt and violent ways that lead to cars colliding or crashing. Sometimes, the fault can be due to another driver’s negligence.

However, very often, it is also the result of mechanical failure. This mechanical failure is often the responsibility of the driver to detect through reasonable means. However, these car issues can be serious issues that can put you and other people in jeopardy. These common car mechanical failures can result in you getting into a horrible accident.

Villa Victoria is the First Approved Subchapter V Bankruptcy in NJ

Villa Victoria Pizzeria and the attorneys at Scura, Wigfield, Heyer, Stevens & Cammarota LLP have had the first ever Chapter 11 Subchapter V Bankruptcy filing approved by US Bankruptcy Court for the District of Jersey. This is the first approved plan of small business reorganization under the new Subchapter V Bankruptcy Code in the District of New Jersey and may be the first in the nation. This is a colossal first step forward in protecting and aiding small businesses.

5 Most Common Disorderly Persons Offenses in NJ

If you are a fan of police or legal procedural shows, you might be shocked by the New Jersey legal system’s lack of familiar criminal jargon. The state of New Jersey does not have “felony” or “misdemeanor” charges. Rather, it incorporates the term Common Disorderly Persons Offenses as a substitute for criminal misdemeanors. These are further broken down into two sub-categories: regular Common Disorderly Persons Offenses and Common Petty Disorderly Persons Offenses.

If you are a New Jersey citizen, you need to know what these disorderly persons offenses are – or at least the most common, popular ones. What do you, as a citizen of the state, need to know about these?

The Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Engagement Ring Scandal – Can a Ring be Liquidated?

Marriage is a life-altering event for so many people. However, so is bankruptcy. When the two become embroiled in one another, things can quickly unravel into a complicated, involved mess. Such is the case with one of our clients, who we refer to as Moon, who wished to file for bankruptcy, only for one conditional gift to fall into a legal gray area.

Moon wished to be married. He had already proposed to his bride-to-be, who wore an engagement ring on her finger. The ring was valued at $30,000, making it quite the valuable stone. However, in the months following his proposal, Moon realized he might need to consider filing for bankruptcy. Specifically, Chapter 7 Bankruptcy. Often referred to as the Liquidation Chapter, Chapter 7 Bankruptcy involves the filing debtor to retain certain assets while the remaining assets, if any, are sold and distributed pro rata to his/her creditors in an effort to partially satisfy the debts that are not wiped thanks to filing. The filing debtor’s assets are determined at the time of filing.

While Chapter 7 Bankruptcy would erase all of Moon’s financial woes, filing introduced a new concern: would he be forced to sell-off the engagement ring he gave to his fiancé to settle his debts?

Unsecured vs. Secured Credit Cards: What is the Difference?

You got your credit report in, and it is not looking too great for your score. Due to a myriad of unfulfilled financial commitments, your credit score is too low to take out new loans. For now, you can watch your dreams of moving out of your apartment and into a house drift off the harbor and into the sea. You need to find a way to raise your score, but you cannot take out new loans and you are being denied credit cards left and right. It feels as if your bad credit score has anchored you under the sea. You sink into dark depths, your last spark of hope drowned out.

Then, the light: secured credit cards.

If you need to raise your credit score, but you are denied credit cards due to low credit, you might want to consider getting a secured credit card to elevate your credit score. This might be daunting. What makes one sort of credit card “secured” while another one is unsecured? Is there a trick that might undermine your financial stability? Should you be worried?

Unsecured and Secured credit cards are similar in that both allow you to buy items on credit, both require you to pay back past dues, and, by consistently paying off credit on your card, your Credit Score can be elevated. However, the difference between unsecured and secured credit cards ultimately amount to one word: collateral. If you do not pay your credit off, creditors will find a way to get their money from you – one way or another.

What Are the Most Common Causes of Car Accidents in New Jersey?

Car accidents occur often in New Jersey. You could be driving along the road when some other driver plows into the side of your vehicle or cuts you off. Drivers can be negligent. Drivers can be drunk. Anger or apathy can result in vehicles speeding down lanes they should not travel, which can only result in you or a loved one being hurt.

If a vehicle has struck you or your car, damaging either your body or possessions, you are entitled to personal injury money. Thankfully, the New Jersey Civil Court system has multiple charges set in place for the most common car accidents out there. If you are caught off-guard, you might want to consider utilizing the following means to get even against those who will hurt you.

Need Help? Contact Us Today!

New Call-to-action 


Feeling Trapped by Your Debt? Download your Free eBook